Tag Archives: pro-life

House Landmark Vote, OKs Ban – Late bortions; Senate, White House rebuff likely

The Washington bureau chief for Baptist Press, Tom Strode, gives an excellent review of this moral act from the House of Representatives. Pray that Americans will regain their sanity about sanctity of life. Rep. Trent Franks, R.-Ariz is to be commended as a faithful Christian, and member of the North Phoenix Baptist Church. In this article Strode reports that 32 Baptists voted for the Ban on Abortion after twenty weeks and two voted against it! We at Baptist.org commend this action although it does not go far enough according to the Word of God!.
Posted on Jun 19, 2013 | by Tom Strode
WASHINGTON (BP) — The U.S. House of Representatives has approved landmark legislation that would prohibit abortions during the last half of pregnancy.In a roll call Tuesday (June 18), the House voted 228-196 for the Pain-capable Unborn Child Protection Act (H.R. 1797), which would ban abortions nationwide on babies 20 weeks or more after fertilization. The ban is set at the developmental stage based on scientific evidence that a child in the womb experiences pain.

The House’s support of the bill, however, is unlikely to translate into approval by the Senate or endorsement by President Obama. The measure will face stronger opposition from senators, and Majority Leader Harry Reid may not bring it to the floor for a vote. The White House has threatened a veto if the bill were to reach Obama’s desk.

Nonetheless, pro-life advocates applauded the House’s passage of what some see as the most important legislative protection for unborn children in years.

“Unborn children aren’t issues to be debated. Issues can’t feel pain and issues can’t die. Unborn children are persons, our neighbors,” said Russell D. Moore, president of the Southern Baptist Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission.

“A compassionate society would demand mercy and justice for those in the dawn of life,” Moore said. “The House was right to recognize such compassionate justice, and I pray our senators and our president will as well by passing and signing this legislation.”

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Trent Franks, AZ-R Baptist influencing Congress

The bill’s sponsor, Rep. Trent Franks, R.-Ariz., said the vote “marks the first time in history, in either chamber of the U.S. Congress, that affirmative protection has been extended to unborn children. It is my prayer that today also marks a day when America finally opens her eyes to the humanity of these little victims and the inhumanity of what is being done to them.”

Douglas Johnson, legislative director of the National Right to Life Committee (NRLC), called it “the most significant piece of pro-life legislation to come before the House since the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act, which the U.S. Supreme Court upheld in 2007.”

The White House, however, issued a policy statement expressing its strong opposition to the bill. Senior advisors would urge Obama to veto the bill if the Senate passes it, according to the statement.

“This bill is a direct challenge to Roe v. Wade and shows contempt for women’s health and rights, the role doctors play in their patients’ health care decisions, and the Constitution,” the Obama administration said.

The Supreme Court’s 1973 opinion in Roe, coupled with a companion ruling in Doe v. Bolton, had the effect of legalizing abortion throughout the country for any reason at any point in pregnancy.

Franks’ bill would alter the dynamic regarding abortion, calling on the courts to consider whether the pain experienced by an unborn child should receive some weight in deciding on a woman’s right to an abortion.

Supporters of the legislation frequently cited the trial of Philadelphia abortion doctor Kermit Gosnell in advocating for the bill. In mid-May, a jury convicted Gosnell of the first-degree murder of three born-alive babies, as well as 21 counts of violating a state ban on abortions after 24 weeks of pregnancy. Gosnell, 72, received three consecutive life sentences without parole for the murder convictions.

Four days after Gosnell’s conviction, Franks announced he would expand the effect of his bill to the entire United States. Prior to that action, Franks’ legislation affected only the District of Columbia, which the U.S. Constitution has granted Congress authority over. Last year, Franks sponsored a similar ban in D.C. but it failed to gain congressional approval. The House voted 220-154 for his measure but it required a two-thirds majority under the rule by which it came to the floor.

The latest House vote on the proposal broke down nearly along party lines. Only six Democrats voted for it and only six Republicans opposed it.

Among Southern Baptist members of the House, 32 voted for the bill, while two voted against it and one was unable to vote. A Southern Baptist, Franks is a member of North Phoenix Baptist Church.

The bill provides exceptions for endangerment to the mother’s life, rape and incest.

A public opinion survey in March by The Polling Company showed 64 percent of American voters would support a law that fits Franks’ proposal with only a threat to the mother’s life as an exception.

Nine states have enacted bans similar to Franks’ bill, according to NRLC.

In the Gosnell case, the three children whom he was convicted of murdering were only some of hundreds at least six months into gestation who were killed outside the womb after induced delivery at a clinic criticized for its unsanitary and unsafe conditions, according to a 281-page report issued by a grand jury in 2011. Gosnell, who destroyed the records in most of those deaths, or a co-worker typically killed the living children by a technique he called “snipping” — jabbing scissors into the back of a baby’s neck and cutting the spinal cord.
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Pro-Life Pioneer Mildred Jefferson Dies

Pro-Life Pioneer Mildred Jefferson Dies

Posted on Oct 19, 2010 | by Staff

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (BP)–Mildred Jefferson, a founder of the National Right to Life Committee and the first black woman to graduate from Harvard Medical School, died Oct. 15 in Cambridge, Mass. She was 84.

“The right-to-life movement has lost a champion and a pioneer. And we have lost a dear friend,” Darla St. Martin, co-executive director of the National Right to Life Committee, said in a statement. “Mildred Jefferson was a valued colleague in our fight for the most vulnerable members of our society and she will be greatly missed.”

In a profile of Jefferson in 2003, The American Feminist, a pro-life magazine, she was quoted as saying, “I am at once a physician, a citizen and a woman, and I am not willing to stand aside and allow this concept of expendable human lives to turn this great land of ours into just another exclusive reservation where only the perfect, the privileged and the planned have the right to live.”

Jefferson was born in east Texas as the only child of a Methodist minister and a schoolteacher, according to The Boston Globe, and she spent days riding around on the horse-drawn buggy of the local doctor as he made house calls.

After graduating from Texas College and Tufts University, Jefferson enrolled at Harvard and later became the first female doctor at Boston University Medical Center and a professor of surgery at the university’s medical school.

In 1970, when the American Medical Association passed a resolution stating that members could ethically perform abortions if the procedure was legal in their states, Jefferson began her fight against abortion, believing that the Hippocratic Oath required her to oppose the procedure.

After cofounding National Right to Life, Jefferson was elected vice chairman of the board in 1973, the year Roe v. Wade gave her profession “an almost unlimited license to kill,” she said. Jefferson subsequently served as chairman of the board for National Right to Life, and from 1975-78 she served three terms as the organization’s president.

In the 1977 National Right to Life convention journal, Jefferson wrote, “We come together from all parts of our land…. We come rich and poor, proud and plain, religious and agnostic, politically committed and independent…. The right-to-life cause is not the concern of only a special few but it should be the cause of all those who care about fairness and justice, love and compassion and liberty with law.”

Jefferson testified before Congress in 1981 in support of a bill that sought to declare that human life “shall be deemed to exist from conception,” according to The New York Times. If the bill had passed, states would have been allowed to prosecute abortion as murder.

“With the obstetrician and mother becoming the worst enemy of the child and the pediatrician becoming the assassin for the family, the state must be enabled to protect the life of the child, born and unborn,” Jefferson said at the hearing.

As an outspoken political voice, Jefferson ran unsuccessfully for the U.S. Senate in 1982, 1984 and 1990. At the time of her death, Jefferson was serving as an at-large director on the National Right to Life board of directors, and she was a popular speaker at right-to-life conventions, rallies and banquets.

The nation’s largest pro-life group, National Right to Life has more than 3,000 local chapters nationwide.

“Mildred Jefferson used every forum available to educate America and encourage people of all ages to become active in the right-to-life movement,” St. Martin of National Right to Life said. “Her legacy will be the countless people — most especially young people — that she brought to the movement by her constant presence and tireless dedication to the cause of life.”
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Compiled by Baptist Press staff writer Erin Roach.