Tag Archives: HL Champion

What the Passion of Christ Teaches Us about Trials – Paul Chappell

What the Passion of Christ Teaches Us about Trials – Paul Chappell

Dr. HL Champion – Editor’s Introduction.

Dr Paul Chappell  is the senior pastor of Lancaster Baptist Church and president of West Coast Baptist College in Lancaster, California. His biblical vision has led the church to become one of the most dynamic Baptist churches in the nation. He sponsors Daily in the Word, a daily radio broadcast heard on over 450 stations across America. Dr. Chappell has four children who are married and serving in Christian ministry. He has been married to his wife Terrie for thirty-one years.

April 15, 2014 by Paul Chappell


On Sunday, we celebrate the victory of the Resurrection of Christ. We remember His triumph, and we thank God for the hope that brings in our lives on a daily basis.

But remember, there could be no resurrection without the crucifixion. The empty tomb is a powerful reminder of the hope we have in Christ’s victory. But the cross shows us how to bear difficulties until victory comes.

From this Easter to last Easter, perhaps you’ve lost a loved one, faced difficult illness, encountered family challenges, lost your job or your home.  In the space of a year, surely every one of us have had times of trial.

During trials, it’s easy to lose perspective. Fear and anxiety can grip our hearts and cause us to lose focus.

And that is why we must look to Christ for an example. Consider Christ’s focus during the last hours before His crucifixion—what we call “the passion of Christ.” In the hours before His death He was in such intense agony of soul that he shed “as it were great drops of blood.” Judas betrayed Him. Peter denied Him. The Pharisees falsely accused Him. And the disciples abandoned him.

Jesus knows suffering. And from His example, we see how to endure trials.

In this two-part post, we’ll see ten truths to remember during trials. Each of these truths we see in Christ’s life in the hours before and during His crucifixion. Each of these can serve as an anchor point for our perspective during difficult times.

Here they are—ten truths to remember during trials:

1. Remember God is in control.

The calmness with which Jesus continued the Passover meal with His disciples just before He went to the Garden of Gethsemane is a lesson in itself. First Corinthians 22:44 tells us He even “gave thanks” as He distributed the elements to His disciples.

And when he had given thanks…—1 Corinthians 11:24

When difficulties enter our lives, we can face them with calm—even grateful—assurance when we remember God is in control.

2. Remember others are learning from you.

Christ could have been consumed with fear of the pain He would soon endure. But He remembered His disciples, and He purposefully seized the moment to teach them the meaning of His crucifixion.

… he brake it, and said, Take, eat: this is my body, which is broken for you: this do in remembrance of me. After the same manner also he took the cup, when he had supped, saying, This cup is the new testament in my blood: this do ye, as oft as ye drink it, in remembrance of me.—1 Corinthians 11:24–25

You and I must likewise remember during times of difficulty that others are watching and learning from us. Spiritual leaders cannot afford the luxury of despair. As Dr. David Gibbs once told me, “Your greatest sermon is you in the valley.”

3. Remember to examine your heart.

Christ never sinned, so this point is more of an application to what we need to do than it is an observation of what He did. But even as Jesus was sharing the Passover meal with His disciples, just before He distributed the bread and the cup, He instigated a moment of heart-examination among the disciples.

And as they did eat, he said, Verily I say unto you, that one of you shall betray me. And they were exceeding sorrowful, and began every one of them to say unto him, Lord, is it I?— Matthew 26:21–22

To this day, serious Christians take care to examine their hearts before partaking of the Lord’s table.

But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat of that bread, and drink of that cup.— 1 Corinthians 11:28

But we don’t have to wait for the Lord’s Table for this self-examination. Trials themselves are powerful motivators to examine our hearts, confess sin to God, and ask God to cleanse our lives. Don’t get so caught up in the trial that you neglect to let it do a purifying work in your heart.

4. Remember to pray.

From the Upper Room, Christ went to the Garden of Gethsemane where He prayed passionately.

And he was withdrawn from them about a stone’s cast, and kneeled down, and prayed…And being in an agony he prayed more earnestly: and his sweat was as it were great drops of blood falling down to the ground.—Luke 22:41, 44

Why in our times of greatest need do we neglect the powerful resource of prayer? We have access directly to the throne of grace! We can worry, or we can bring our needs to the One who understands, cares, and helps.

For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need.— Hebrews 4:15–16

5. Remember to surrender to God’s plan.

As Christ drew near to the sufferings of the Cross, He prayed that there might be another way…but even as He did, He submitted to the will of the Father.

Saying, Father, if thou be willing, remove this cup from me: nevertheless not my will, but thine, be done.—Luke 22:42

The Father’s plan in Jesus’ suffering was our redemption—I’m glad Jesus surrendered to it.

God has a plan in our suffering too, and that plan is our conformity to the image of Christ.

And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose. For whom he did foreknow, he also did predestinate to be conformed to the image of his Son, that he might be the firstborn among many brethren.—Romans 8:28–29

In the midst of our pain, we sometimes forget that God has a purpose and that He promises to use every aspect of our lives for our good and His glory. Surrender to His plan. As Amy Carmichael once said, “In acceptance lieth peace.”

When we are in times of difficulty, it’s easy to allow our minds to spin out of control. We grasp for solutions as we worry, doubt, and fear the worst.

But Jesus showed us how to suffer:

  1. Remember God is in control.
  2. Remember others are learning from you.
  3. Remember to examine your heart.
  4. Remember to pray.
  5. Remember to surrender to God’s plan.



Email facebook@lancasterbaptist.org
Website http://paulchappell.com



Missions in Myanmar

Missions in Myanmar

My Calling to the Burmese People Part I –  Dr. HL Champion

After two years of intercessory prayer from Samuel Lian a Burmese pastor in Kalamyo, Myanmar with his small church and college their request was granted from God. After being friended on Facebook from this insidiousness and persistent man of God, Pastor Lian rallied his prayer troupes every week in prayer for me to come and minister among his people.

After several exchanges of prayer emergences on both parts, his and mine. We grew to become true Pastor Friends. Yes, may online requests are made from third world preachers of the Gospel for those who have to come and minister to them who have little of this world’s goods. Many in other lands are fraudulent as the ministry of Christ is merchandised to receive funds mainly for the use of the ministry leader. Such as it is in America.

But, great numbers are legitimate. While many invitations come to most of the ministers on Facebook to “come and see”.    This short page introduces to you a vast mission field so unlike other third world countries and the mission strategies of so many Christian groups. Bible Believing preachers of the Gospel have used the boarders surrounding Myanmar to cross over and provide a semi-underground evangelism. It is to the Glory of God for all that has happened in this manner.

God has allowed me to come into this Mission field directly as an American Independent Baptist by invitation which is developing into  life calling for the rest of my days! Blessings on you who follow Burmese Missions.

If you wish to participate with World Missions in any form or field contact Dr Champion at worldmissions@baptist.org



Scouts Proposes Gay Youth Not Gay Leaders

Scouts Proposes Gay Youth Not Gay Leaders

Michael Foust of Baptist Press does a good job in presenting the true imbalance of those opposing Boy Scouts being expanded to Gay Scouts!  However, while the nation’s attention was turned to Boston on Friday morning, the Boy Scouts of America announced that it intends to end its ban on gay members, as long as its board approves the change. The organization would still, however, prohibit gay adults from serving as troop leaders or volunteers.

The proposed new policy states, “No youth may be denied membership in the Boy Scouts of America on the basis of sexual orientation or preference alone.” The proposed policy also reinforces the organization’s position that “Scouting is a youth program, and any sexual conduct, whether homosexual or heterosexual, by youth of Scouting age is contrary to the virtues of Scouting.”

The change would apply only to members; it does not change the policy regarding gay troop leaders or other volunteers. “The BSA will maintain the current membership policy for all adults,” said Deron Smith, the group’s spokesman.



Scouts propose allowing gay-identifying youth

Posted on Apr 19, 2013 | by Michael Foust

IRVING, Texas (BP) — Members at the Boy Scouts national convention in May will consider a proposal that would leave in place the prohibition on homosexual Scout leaders but would allow youth who identify as gay to join, it was announced Friday (Ap

bsaEmblemThe proposed policy, unanimously approved by the Boy Scouts executive committee, differs significantly from a proposal that was discussed in February that would have allowed openly gay leaders and youth to join. That policy would have made it a “local option,” whereby each sponsoring organization would decide the policy. Under the new proposal, there is a national standard and no local option.

“No youth may be denied membership in the Boy Scouts of America on the basis of sexual orientation or preference alone,” the proposed resolution states in part.

The resolution criticizes sexual activity by youth, saying Scouting “is a youth program, and any sexual conduct, whether homosexual or heterosexual, by youth of Scouting age is contrary to the virtues of Scouting.” Two paragraphs later it further says that “youth are still developing, learning about themselves and who they are, developing their sense of right and wrong, and understanding their duty to God to live a moral life.”

The Boy Scouts leadership appeared poised in early February to lift its prohibition on gay Scout leaders and youth but — facing pressure from its base — decided to put the matter before its 1,400 voting members at the national convention, which will be in May.

Frank Page, president of the Southern Baptist Convention’s Executive Committee, was outspoken earlier this year in urging the Boy Scouts to keep their current policy.
“We said in January we wished the Scouts would listen to the whole scouting family, not just a few,” Page said Friday. “The leadership listened. Chief among the concerns they heard is the influence of adult leaders on impressionable youth. Though this resolution is more acceptable to those who hold a biblical form of morality than what was being considered before, we would still prefer no change in the policy. A No vote keeps the current policy in place, an outcome we would overwhelmingly support.”

Also on Friday, the Boy Scouts released the results of a series of surveys it conducted.

Among the findings:

— 61 percent of adult Scout members favor the current policy, while 34 percent oppose it.

— 61 percent of Boy Scout parents support the current policy, while 50 percent of Cub Scout parents back it (45 percent of Cub Scout parents oppose it).

— 51 percent of major donors support the current policy while 33 percent oppose it. But a majority of Fortune 500 companies want to see the policy changed.

— A majority of teens ages 16-18 in the Boy Scouts program oppose the current policy. A percentage was not given.

Scouts Moral 01The Boy Scouts also said that parents, teens and the Scouting community “do not favor” a local option as proposed in February.


Michael Foust is associate editor of Baptist Press. Get Baptist Press headlines and breaking news on Twitter (@BaptistPress), Facebook (Facebook.com/BaptistPress ) and in your email (baptistpress.com/SubscribeBP.asp).