Category Archives: Featured

Men Like Hur Make Great Fathers

Dr. HL Champion Introduces – Jimmy Chapman, pastor of Victory Baptist Church Washington, GA

Jimmy Chapman 01 Although I have never met Jimmy Chapman his Father’s Day Sermon Outline is  excellent. He posts regularly on the Fundamental Baptist Sermon Outlines  group of Facebook. Hur and Aaron,  always reversed in the scriptures, is an  unknown hero of scriptures.


 There is a song about a boy named Sue and recently we have heard about a man  named Catilyn. Well this morning I want to preach on man name Hur.

EXODUS 17:8-13

 As the children of Israel journeyed toward the Promised Land, they are faced  with their first encounter with an enemy army. The Bible tells us that they came face to face with the armies of Amalek. The Amalekties were a nomadic tribe that were a thorn in the side of the people of Israel. In this first encounter, they prove their nature by conducting an unprovoked attack against the Israelites.

In this passage of scripture , we find the great leader Moses mentioned, along with Aaron, as well as the first mention Continue Reading



Jessie Duplantis Heaven01
“I went to Heaven” Jessie Duplantis

Dr. H.L. Champion Presents David Cloud  . . . .
The following is an excerpt from our new 317-page book “The Pentecostal-Charismatic Movement: Its History and Error,” available from Way of Life Literature.

Not only are there many Pentecostals who claim to have seen Jesus, some have even made trips to heaven.

Pentecostal evangelist John Lake claimed to have visited heaven. So did Percy Collett, Dudley Danielson, Marvin Ford, Aline Baxley, Kenneth Hagin, Sr., Benny Hinn, Roberts Lairdon, and many others.

In 1977 Richard Eby claimed that he died and went to heaven and he brought back the revelation that “the primary nerve in God’s cranium is the sense of smell.” He said that in heaven he could move anywhere at will and that he was visible yet transparent. Continue Reading

Presbyterian Church USA Validate Homosexual Pastors

Presbyterian Church USA Validate Homosexual Pastors

Editor Comments  – By Dr H.L Champion

One by one Church groups are manipulated by social trends of sexual perversion. The Presbyterian USA Denomination has for decades shifted to the  far left of Biblical guidelines and sensible morality. This Associated Press release is uncut and does not fully represent the positions of Baptist.Org. It is just the news. The implications are numerous.

It goes without saying, “That it needs to be said”; America is going straight to hell in a church offering plate.  Good people in so many Church groups have supported the very antithesis of their beliefs. But, no more.

Associated Press, FileDr. Ray Whetstone, right, an ordained chuch elder at the Second Presbyterian Church in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, poses at the church with his long-time lover Wesley Pennington, the church worship director, on March 11, 1998. Whetstone, then 39, was facing a church trial initiated by another elder who was outraged that Second Presbyterian ordained the openly gay man.

PATRICK CONDON, Associated Press Writer

MINNEAPOLIS, Minnesota — Leaders of the Presbyterian church have voted to allow non-celibate gays in committed relationships to serve as clergy.

Thursday’s vote isn’t a final stamp of approval for the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) or its more than 2 million members. But it’s a step that could make the church one of the most gay-friendly major Christian denominations in the country.

Delegates voted during the church’s general assembly in Minneapolis, with 53 percent approving the more liberal policy. A separate vote is expected later Thursday on whether to change the church’s definition of marriage from between “a man and a woman” to between “two people.”

But such changes would take effect only if approved by a majority of the church’s 173 regional presbyteries and its more than 2 million members.

The assembly voted two years ago to liberalize the gay clergy policy, but it died last year when 94 of the presbyteries voted against it.

Still, the proposed changes “have the potential to be historic,” said Cindy Bolbach, an elder at National Capital Presbytery in Washington and the assembly’s elected moderator.

Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) is ranked the 10th-largest church in the U.S. with 2.8 million members, according to the National Council of Churches’ 2010 “Yearbook of American and Canadian Churches.” But its own media materials tout 2.1 million members.

Earlier this week, both proposed constitutional changes were approved by assembly committees. The gay clergy change passed 36-16, and the definition of marriage cleared on a vote of 34-18.

“There are still big steps ahead, but I’m feeling better about this than I ever have before,” said the Rev. Ray Bagnuolo, the openly gay pastor of Janhus Presbyterian Church in New York City.

Some conservative-minded Presbyterians tried to rally opposition to the changes.

“Blurring or obscuring the clear teaching of God’s Word in order to keep in step with secular laws and changing personal morals only confuses our witness and causes innumerable problems for the future,” Presbyterians for Renewal, a group opposed to the changes, wrote on its website.

“Our church is divided and actions we take today at general assembly can split it even further,” Donna Rivett, an elder at the Presbytery of Tropical Florida, said during assembly debate on the gay clergy policy.

Under current church policy, Presbyterians are only eligible to become clergy, deacons or elders if they are married or celibate. The new policy would strike references to sexuality altogether in favor of candidates committed to “joyful submission to worship of Christ.”

A number of major Christian denominations have voted in recent years to allow non-celibate gays to serve as clergy if they are in committed relationships. Among them are the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, the U.S. Episcopal Church and the United Church of Christ.

“For the Presbyterian Church to stay current and enter the next generation, they really need to let go of this debate,” said the Rev. Cindi Love, executive director of SoulForce, a gay Christian group.

Love said she also believed that if the Presbyterians approve the redefinition of marriage, the church would become the largest U.S. Christian denomination to recognize marriage between same-sex couples.

A separate measure, which would also require regional ratification, would remove the threat of punishment for clergy who perform same-sex marriages in states that allow it.

June 10/2014 AP

Editor’s Post comments –
The Homosexual agenda is not to be accepted but to intrusive. There is no choice in the matter societally. If not included in all areas of church matters it will be considered a “Hate Crime”. That day is upon the Churches of our land, including Baptists.

What the Passion of Christ Teaches Us about Trials – Paul Chappell

What the Passion of Christ Teaches Us about Trials – Paul Chappell

Dr. HL Champion – Editor’s Introduction.

Dr Paul Chappell  is the senior pastor of Lancaster Baptist Church and president of West Coast Baptist College in Lancaster, California. His biblical vision has led the church to become one of the most dynamic Baptist churches in the nation. He sponsors Daily in the Word, a daily radio broadcast heard on over 450 stations across America. Dr. Chappell has four children who are married and serving in Christian ministry. He has been married to his wife Terrie for thirty-one years.

April 15, 2014 by Paul Chappell


On Sunday, we celebrate the victory of the Resurrection of Christ. We remember His triumph, and we thank God for the hope that brings in our lives on a daily basis.

But remember, there could be no resurrection without the crucifixion. The empty tomb is a powerful reminder of the hope we have in Christ’s victory. But the cross shows us how to bear difficulties until victory comes.

From this Easter to last Easter, perhaps you’ve lost a loved one, faced difficult illness, encountered family challenges, lost your job or your home.  In the space of a year, surely every one of us have had times of trial.

During trials, it’s easy to lose perspective. Fear and anxiety can grip our hearts and cause us to lose focus.

And that is why we must look to Christ for an example. Consider Christ’s focus during the last hours before His crucifixion—what we call “the passion of Christ.” In the hours before His death He was in such intense agony of soul that he shed “as it were great drops of blood.” Judas betrayed Him. Peter denied Him. The Pharisees falsely accused Him. And the disciples abandoned him.

Jesus knows suffering. And from His example, we see how to endure trials.

In this two-part post, we’ll see ten truths to remember during trials. Each of these truths we see in Christ’s life in the hours before and during His crucifixion. Each of these can serve as an anchor point for our perspective during difficult times.

Here they are—ten truths to remember during trials:

1. Remember God is in control.

The calmness with which Jesus continued the Passover meal with His disciples just before He went to the Garden of Gethsemane is a lesson in itself. First Corinthians 22:44 tells us He even “gave thanks” as He distributed the elements to His disciples.

And when he had given thanks…—1 Corinthians 11:24

When difficulties enter our lives, we can face them with calm—even grateful—assurance when we remember God is in control.

2. Remember others are learning from you.

Christ could have been consumed with fear of the pain He would soon endure. But He remembered His disciples, and He purposefully seized the moment to teach them the meaning of His crucifixion.

… he brake it, and said, Take, eat: this is my body, which is broken for you: this do in remembrance of me. After the same manner also he took the cup, when he had supped, saying, This cup is the new testament in my blood: this do ye, as oft as ye drink it, in remembrance of me.—1 Corinthians 11:24–25

You and I must likewise remember during times of difficulty that others are watching and learning from us. Spiritual leaders cannot afford the luxury of despair. As Dr. David Gibbs once told me, “Your greatest sermon is you in the valley.”

3. Remember to examine your heart.

Christ never sinned, so this point is more of an application to what we need to do than it is an observation of what He did. But even as Jesus was sharing the Passover meal with His disciples, just before He distributed the bread and the cup, He instigated a moment of heart-examination among the disciples.

And as they did eat, he said, Verily I say unto you, that one of you shall betray me. And they were exceeding sorrowful, and began every one of them to say unto him, Lord, is it I?— Matthew 26:21–22

To this day, serious Christians take care to examine their hearts before partaking of the Lord’s table.

But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat of that bread, and drink of that cup.— 1 Corinthians 11:28

But we don’t have to wait for the Lord’s Table for this self-examination. Trials themselves are powerful motivators to examine our hearts, confess sin to God, and ask God to cleanse our lives. Don’t get so caught up in the trial that you neglect to let it do a purifying work in your heart.

4. Remember to pray.

From the Upper Room, Christ went to the Garden of Gethsemane where He prayed passionately.

And he was withdrawn from them about a stone’s cast, and kneeled down, and prayed…And being in an agony he prayed more earnestly: and his sweat was as it were great drops of blood falling down to the ground.—Luke 22:41, 44

Why in our times of greatest need do we neglect the powerful resource of prayer? We have access directly to the throne of grace! We can worry, or we can bring our needs to the One who understands, cares, and helps.

For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need.— Hebrews 4:15–16

5. Remember to surrender to God’s plan.

As Christ drew near to the sufferings of the Cross, He prayed that there might be another way…but even as He did, He submitted to the will of the Father.

Saying, Father, if thou be willing, remove this cup from me: nevertheless not my will, but thine, be done.—Luke 22:42

The Father’s plan in Jesus’ suffering was our redemption—I’m glad Jesus surrendered to it.

God has a plan in our suffering too, and that plan is our conformity to the image of Christ.

And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose. For whom he did foreknow, he also did predestinate to be conformed to the image of his Son, that he might be the firstborn among many brethren.—Romans 8:28–29

In the midst of our pain, we sometimes forget that God has a purpose and that He promises to use every aspect of our lives for our good and His glory. Surrender to His plan. As Amy Carmichael once said, “In acceptance lieth peace.”

When we are in times of difficulty, it’s easy to allow our minds to spin out of control. We grasp for solutions as we worry, doubt, and fear the worst.

But Jesus showed us how to suffer:

  1. Remember God is in control.
  2. Remember others are learning from you.
  3. Remember to examine your heart.
  4. Remember to pray.
  5. Remember to surrender to God’s plan.